Louis Vuitton Fall 2014

Up until a week ago I’d forgotten that this Louis Vuitton was going to be the most anticipated show of the season. Thankfully I haven’t been counting down the days, as that would have made the disappointment even worse. I think the whole concept of taking your predecessor’s style and adding your own handwriting worked really well for Alexander Wang at Balenciaga, but not so much the case for Nicholas Ghesquière at Louis Vuitton. This basically looks like a cleaner, more structure version of Marc Jacobs for Louis Vuitton. That’s not what we want! Plus it is boring. And excuse me, but writing a cheesy letter to your show guests, pretty much begging them to like the collection, is totally lame.

I love…

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a chic white zipper front shirt dress.


I loathe…

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that this looks like a toned down version of Marc Jacobs.

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when the first word that comes to mind is “tacky.”

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that this makes me wonder if Hedi Slimane and Nicholas Ghesquière went to some crappy thrift stores together to find clothes for their runway.

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the boredom I feel when looking at this outfit.

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that there are almost no distinguishing features to this show. Every collection needs a story and this runway doesn’t have one.

Images from Vogue.com.

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  • Rajan Sami

    Haha finally a voice of reason. You know I likes me some Ghesquiere and I was counting down to this show only to be severely underwhelmed. What happened? And rhetorical question: why are none of the established press calling it? You’d think it was the second coming going by their reviews, they’re almost all very reverential.

    It was reported that one of the reasons behind Ghesquiere’s dismissal from Balenciaga was his inability to produce commercial clothing but Vuitton is perhaps the one brand where the clothing can just be window dressing to the bags and not have to sell. Jacobs got that, hence the elaborate presentations that were more focused on creating buzz than selling clothes.

    Let’s hope that Ghesquiere’s more experimental side surfaces in seasons to come. As I type this I think back of his very early seasons at Balenciaga and Callaghan during the mid 90s when his clothes were edgy but always beautiful and before they became mostly weird and unwearable (but still interesting to look at nonetheless). Having said that, this has been a really disappointing and lacklustre season on the whole: my other favorites: dries, celine, etc – none of them seemed to break any new ground.

  • Freja

    It’s so evident here how little personality LV has. When you strip down the antics, there’s no substance left. What surprises me the most is how boring it was. Ghesquiere and boring? Never thought it would be him of all designers.

  • alexandrasuhnerisenberg

    Yup – it is a major disappointment!

  • alexandrasuhnerisenberg

    Great point about LV’s clothes, and the fact that they are such a small percentage of the business. He could have done something so cool here, and instead it was really lame. And I agree that in general it has been a pretty boring fashion month.

  • alexandrasuhnerisenberg

    Oh yeah, and the press have to kiss ass to LVMH, and I think everyone is now scared of pissing anyone off and having to deal with a Twitter attack.

  • Rajan Sami

    I read that under Jacobs, clothing accounted for less than 5% of revenues. I have to say, while I didn’t see the point of Jacobs last “black, showgirl” collection, seeing it anew in the campaign and in magazine editorials, it feels fresh or at least like a modern take on grunge (particularly the attitude you get from pairing blue stonewashed jeans and elaborately embellished pieces together.) Whether it is wearable or will be worn (or even produced) is besides the point I think as the clothes are being used to convey a mood, which is missing from this new collection.

    Editorial sell-outs are calling it modern but all the retro-kitsch silhouettes, details and in some cases entire pieces and looks make it look like a bad pastiche of opshop finds, old Jacobs, miu miu and Slimane’s saint Laurent (as you’ve pointed out).

    Much is being madexperimentation with fabrics but the overuse of leather, suede, etc because Vuitton is a leather goods house is too literal an interpretation.

  • alexandrasuhnerisenberg

    This is not modern, it is the opposite of modern. He must be happy that Cathy Horyn retired as I am sure she would have called it. And yes, there’s no story or mood, which makes this utterly boring. Such a disappointment.